Blog

Monitoring the impacts of Talisman Sabre

Posted by on Sep 22, 2021 in Blog, Case Study | 0 comments

Monitoring the impacts of Talisman Sabre

The Marines arrived in-country the night before.  Suffering a good dose of jet-lag, they joined their Australian counterparts for six hours of training in the new data capture system they were to use for the next month.  Many will be isolated with no assistance.  “Ease of use” and “reliable” just got serious. The Brief The brief was straight forward.  Enable military personnel to record environmental impacts during Exercise Talisman Sabre.  Involving 22,000 troops, 18 sea vessels, 25 aircraft and 1,500 road vehicles, the exercise is managed...

Read More

Syncing large datasets over low bandwidth links

Posted by on Oct 25, 2011 in Blog, Case Study | 0 comments

Syncing large datasets over low bandwidth links

They needed to synchronise their ESRI GeoDatabase out to near on a hundred clients, over an unreliable cellular or 3G  network.  We’re talking thousands of features, containing up to several hundred thousand vertices each.  That’s when my phone rang. “Lance” they cried, “we’ve already tried the provided ESRI syncing frameworks, and people are shouting at us because we can’t get it to work.  What can we do, and how soon can you get here?”  A couple of days later saw me on the red-eye to the north island to find out what we were dealing...

Read More

Google maps providing intel to the robot invasion

Posted by on Sep 30, 2011 in Blog, Uncategorized | 0 comments

  Want proof?  Head over to State of Chaos, plug in your name and address, and watch as your home is destroyed by invading robots. It may sound corny, and it is, but I think the point to highlight is the sorts of things that can be done with publically available data sets, like streetview and google maps. I’m sure we’ll see many more augmented reality mashups coming our way soon. Oh, you may be wandering how I’m typing this if my house was destroyed?  Lucky for me street view has a vacant block where my house now stands, so in the parallel dimension, I suckered those...

Read More

Who fixes your field data?

Posted by on Aug 12, 2011 in Blog, Uncategorized | 0 comments

  I was having a conversation with a client yesterday, and while just throwing ideas around, she offered up a gem.  “Why not get the field users to correct their own data.”  It’s brilliant in its simplicity, and the long term ramifications of adopting this work flow are huge. For those of us who’ve either managed work crews collecting information, or were perhaps once doing the collection ourselves, how many times have you heard the phrase “Don’t worry about it, they’ll fix it up in the office.”Let’s be clear, this...

Read More

Screen scraping for data in 2011? Really?

Posted by on Mar 7, 2011 in Blog, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Source: http://www.agm.me.uk/blog/ Dave Bouwman just posted about developing a mobile app for the ESRI dev summit.  The thing that pipped my interest what that in order to get the data, he had to do some screen scraping.  Now this is no slight on him, as it was no doubt the only way to get it.  What boggles my mind though, is that in 2011 us developers are still having to resort to screen scraping to acquire public data. I guess it’s a fundamental flaw in the way we think of publishing data.  The process we go through is this… Collect the data Decide...

Read More

Making mobile GIS work

Posted by on Dec 7, 2010 in Blog, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Last week I did a presentation titled “Making Mobile GIS Work”.  A couple of attendees have since asked for a copy of my presentation, but as my slides only contained headings, I thought I’d flesh it out here for the benefit of the wider community. The idea behind the talk was that I see the same mistakes being made over and over again, which in a lot of cases, mean failed projects.  In pretty much all cases, it’s not the technology, or the idea what was lacking, but rather that the system was too complex for the intended operators/environment, or that it was...

Read More